Tuesday, October 9, 2018

NMSU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences department recognized at national conference


NMSU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences department recognized at national conference
DATE: 10/09/2018
WRITER: Adriana M. Chavez, 575-646-1957, adchavez@nmsu.edu
CONTACT: Priscilla Bloomquist, 575-646-2877, pbloomqu@nmsu.edu

The Extension Family and Consumer Sciences department at New Mexico State University’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences recently brought home a slew of awards from this year’s National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences conference.

Twelve Extension agents, four specialists and a lifetime member represented NMSU at the conference, which took place in San Antonio, Texas, last month. New Mexico received seven Western Regional awards and three National awards. Judy O’Loughlin, the program director and Family and Consumer Sciences agent in Grant County, was recognized with the Distinguished Service Award.

Cindy Davies, the program director and Family and Consumer Sciences agent in Bernalillo County, was elected to a national board position and will serve as the NEAFCS vice president of member resources.

“It has been such a pleasure for me to have the opportunity to get to know this group of dedicated Extension Family and Consumer Sciences professionals,” said Priscilla Bloomquist, interim head of the Family and Consumer Sciences and Extension Family and Consumer Sciences department at NMSU. “These awards provide the national recognition they deserve for the outstanding programming they deliver to communities throughout the state.”

The following is a list of awards NMSU received:

First place National and first place Western Region Family Health and Wellness Award – Team leaders Karim Martinez and Cassandra Vanderpool; and team members Dianne Christensen, Chase Elkins, Aspen Achen, Jennah McKinley, Judy O’Loughlin, Leigh Ann Marez, Robin Mack Haynes, Laynee Kuenstler, Kelly Knight, Brenda Bishop, Vanessa Martinez, Nicole Lujan, Richard Griffiths, Leah Platero, Cydney Martin, Tony Valdez, Laura Bittner, Lourdes Olivas, Raquel Garzon, Shannon Wooton and Desaree Jimenez.

First place National and first place Western Region Program Excellence Through Research Award – Bryce Jorgensen.

First place Western Region Dean Don Felker Financial Management Award – Team leader Bryce Jorgensen and team members Karim Martinez, Brenda Bishop and Richard Griffiths.

First place Western Region Communications Award: Educational Publication – Raquel Garzon.

First place Western Region Communications Award: Newsletters – Cydney Martin.

First place Western Region Innovations in Programming – Team leader Raquel Garzon and team member Dianne Christensen.

First place Western Region Florence Hall Award – Raquel Garzon.

Distinguished Service Award – Judy O’Loughlin.

NEAFCS educates and recognizes Extension professionals who improve the quality of life for individuals, families and communities. For more information about the organization, visit www.neafcs.org.

Guide G-244: Protect Your Credit Cards


The following CES publication has been revised and is now available online in PDF format.


Guide G-244: Protect Your Credit Cards
Bryce Jorgensen (Extension Family Resource Management Specialist, Dept. of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences)
Lauren Rodriquez (Research Assistant, Dept. of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences)

Monday, October 8, 2018

WINTER CAR CARE CAN BE THREAT TO PETS

WINTER CAR CARE CAN BE THREAT TO PETS

Colder outdoor temperatures mean many people are winterizing their cars, trucks, and tractors which can bring additional health hazards to households and especially to pets. Antifreeze, a liquid combined with water to lower a car's freezing point, and is one of the most serious wintertime threats to pets.

Dogs and cats are attracted to antifreeze because it tastes sweet.  Unfortunately, so are young children. This product can be toxic even in small doses. Animals come into contact with antifreeze because of spills or by finding and opening the antifreeze container. Cats are more susceptible because they will lick it off of their paws, and they are much smaller so smaller doses can be fatal.

"Antifreeze is the one of the most common poisonings we see in pets, and any contact with the substance can be fatal," said Dr. Tim Hackett, chief of Critical Care at the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Colorado State University. "That is why it is so important for pet owners to understand what they can do to prevent antifreeze poisoning in their own homes."

Antifreeze is most commonly a fluorescent green-colored mixture. But now we have different formulations for different makes and it can be orange or other colors as well.  It
usually contains ethylene glycol, which causes lethal kidney failure.  While not lethal when ingested, ethylene glycol becomes toxic as it is broken down by enzymes in the liver.

Common signs that a pet may have ingested antifreeze include having the
fluorescent green, orange or other color on their tongue, snout or paws. Once ingested, the effects are similar to alcohol intoxication and the animal walks in a
wobbly, drunken manner. The ethylene glycol in the antifreeze is quickly
metabolized by the liver into toxic calcium oxalates that cause circulation problems and irreversible kidney damage.

If a pet may have ingested antifreeze, do not hesitate to take it to an
emergency clinic for a blood test. If the test is positive, it typically
takes a couple of days of drug and fluid treatment to get the pet's health
back on track. Treatment aims to prevent the metabolic conversion into the
toxic compound, and if successful, most of the ethylene glycol is excreted
unchanged.

Another suggestion is to switch to non-toxic antifreeze which does not
contain ethylene glycol.  There are products that contain a close chemical call propylene glycol and works almost as well.  This is the anti-freeze used in RV storage for the winter.  Hackett said that the best ways to keep pet’s safe are to cleanup all spills and regularly check for leaks under cars. Also, if changing antifreeze at home, keep it out of reach, discard old antifreeze properly and do not dump it along gutters or in places where a wandering animal might find it. The City of Carlsbad and the Eddy County are having a toxic waste day on October 27 at the beach.  You dispose of used anti-freeze there as well of other household chemical and up to 10 used tires.  If possible, bring chemical in their original containers so after draining your anti-freeze and putting new into your cooling system put the old back into the containers and write with permanent maker used on it.  Subscribe to Eddy County Ag news at: http://nmsueddyag.blogspot.com/  Eddy County Extension Service, New Mexico State University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer and educator.  All programs are available to everyone regardless of race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap, or national origin.  New Mexico State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Eddy County Government Cooperating.

Guide G-224: Unfair Trade Practices


he following CES publication has been revised and is now available online in PDF format.


Guide G-224: Unfair Trade Practices
Bryce Jorgensen (Extension Family Resource Management Specialist, Dept. of Extension Family and Consumer Sciences)